Tag Archives: NCAA

NCAA Tourney Turns Into Bracketology Blow Up

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The Dance

By John Ventola

The NCAA hung the popular moniker on the annual March event, Garth Brooks sings a song so titled. Today The Dance is down to sixteen teams. By tomorrow night it will dwindle to the Elite Eight. Sunday nigh there will only be four teams left to dance in next weekend’s Final Four. Continue reading

Revenge Boomerangs and Hits Wake Forest Broadcast Analyst

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Cheating for Victory Always Distasteful

His name was not mentioned on the television show appropriately named Cheaters. His name did not appear on the infamous Ashley Madison list that was hacked with personal information about signed-up philanderers. Continue reading

Missouri Resignations Far From A Victory Over Injustice

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Should Student Athletes Get Involved In Social Issues

By John Ventola

The announced resignations Monday of University of Missouri president Tim Wolfe and school chancellor R. Bowen Loftin for alleged failure to address racial incidents, discrimination, and major tension on the flagship campus in Columbia have been met with glowing media comments and student celebrations. Continue reading

Collegiate Football Rivalries Dwindling

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Conference Realignments Stop Some Longtime Rivalries

By John Ventola 

Rivalries have always played a major role in establishing the popularity of collegiate football. Whether they involved service academies (Army versus Navy), in-state rivals (Washington against Washington State, Oklahoma versus Oklahoma State, etc.), conference adversaries, (Minnesota against Wisconsin), or cross country rivals (USC versus Notre Dame), the games played under the rivalry heading kept fan interest at a maximum level because those were the contests that would be discussed until the two teams met again one year later. The winning fan base could enjoy bragging rights, but the losing team’s loyal followers could shout out, ‘wait till next year’, and know a chance at redemption was just twelve months away. Collegiate football rivalries are a colorful part of American sports history, but sadly conference realignments by the NCAA during recent years are causing some key rivalries to stop. Continue reading

College Football Playoff Season Off And Running

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Gurley Runs Like A Man

 By John Ventola

The inaugural College Football Playoff season kicked off last week with a lot of fanfare and anticipation. Starting this year, teams will be playing to ensure they are definitely in college football’s version of the Final Four come late December. Gone will be the unbecoming sports information campaigns to support certain teams and leagues, and coaches brazenly politicking for their own squads. Hopefully. 

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College Baseball and World Soccer Scoring Mimics Each Other

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Low Scores Now In Vogue

By John Ventola

 

Sports fans that enjoy close, low scoring athletic events should be happy these days. The World Cup is in full leg-swinging motion in Brazil, and College World Series participants in Omaha are swinging bats in hopes of scratching in a run. Consequently, fans do not have to crane their necks too much doing scoreboard checks. It seems almost every match and game is 1-0 or 2-1. While the scoring in national soccer and collegiate baseball lends itself to such low-scoring affairs, the World Cup and CWS are not lacking for feverish, fanatical fan bases. Each goal and run results in hugs, high fives, and flag waving.

Every kick, every header, every pitch, and every throw are followed with anticipation. Both games feature skilled, well-trained athletes, and strategy that often bores the unfamiliar watcher, but positively thrills the knowledgeable viewer when a point or run is scored. The stadium celebrations are enough to make national soccer and collegiate baseball worth watching. Although one is for national pride and world recognition, and the other is only USA- based, I would hate to explain to a young, college championship shortstop that the trophy he is holding does not mean much. Or mention it to the fans and students of that university at a football tailgate in the fall. Continue reading